HANDWRITING

 

Handwriting is taught throughout school until children have developed  fluent, legible and eventually speedy handwriting. We use the handwriting letter formation from RWI for our initial letters in Early Years.

We follow the school handwriting policy  which is in line with the National curriculum document and teach the children how to join using our four joining rules.

 

Handwriting and the National Curriculum

 

The National Curriculum specifies that primary school children should work towards mastering handwriting that is fluent, legible and, eventually, speedy.

There are specific targets for each year group.

In Year 1, pupils should be taught to:

  • Sit correctly at the table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly.
  • Begin to form lower case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place.
  • Form capital letters.
  • Form the digits 0 to 9.
  • Understand which letters belong to which handwriting ‘family’ (a group of letters that are formed in the same way).

In Year 2, pupils are expected to:

  • Form lower case letters of the correct size, relative to one another.
  • Start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters, and understand which letters are best left unjoined.
  • Write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another.
  • Use spacing between words that is appropriate for the size of the letters.

In Years 3 and 4, children should:

  • Continue to develop their joined-up handwriting.
  • Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting – for example, ensuring that downstrokes of letters are straight and parallel, not sloping.

In Years 5 and 6, children are taught to:

  • Write with increasing legibility, fluency and speed.
  • Choose which shape of a letter to use, and decide whether or not to join specific letters.
  • Choose the writing implement that is best suited for a task.